Gardening Au Naturel

  • alan hall commented on Group logo of Gardening  Au NaturelNatMarc‘s photo 6 months, 2 weeks ago

    The trouble is the grass cheats and grows despite the temperature, at least you do get warm pushing the mower and survive till the next battle with the grass

  • The weather’s not great, but the lawn has to be mown, the naturist way!

    …the naturist way. As it should always be done, temperature permitting.

  • JimmieM posted an update in the group Group logo of Gardening  Au NaturelGardening Au Naturel 8 months ago

    It looks like the weather forcast for the next week will give us some nice temps for at least a week. I will now start planting the garden. The soil will be dry enough to work without making mud balls.

  • verified badge Pasis uploaded 1 new Photo to Group logo of Gardening  Au NaturelGardening Au Naturel 8 months ago

    I got wrong seeds from the Jungle Seeds. I had to get Exotic vegetable seed mix, but no. I get sexy seed collection mix. 😂 I did not look inside the bag when I got it. So it’s my mistake too.

    And this titty fruits and others sound so funny, that I have to try grow them. 😉

    (And my english is still bad,
    sorry)

    • Well, not what you expected, but go ahead and plant them. It will be fun to see what they look like!

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  • Is it really spring here. Crocus are in flower and bees fly from flower to flower. I must remember buy vegetable seeds to germinate.

    • The Crocus and Daffodil have pretty much finished as well as plum trees. Pear have been blooming about two weeks and the cherries are just starting to bloom. Some of the wild flowers are blooming but the weather has not been favorable for getting out to take pictures.

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  • JimmieM posted an update in the group Group logo of Gardening  Au NaturelGardening Au Naturel 8 months, 2 weeks ago

    I started prepping soil for setting out plant starts but it was still a bit on the wet side and now we have several days of heavy rain in the forcast. It is still early here for outdoor gardening.

  • JimmieM posted an update in the group Group logo of Gardening  Au NaturelGardening Au Naturel 9 months, 1 week ago

    Starting some seeds indoors so they will be ready to plant out later when it warms up a little more.

  • JimmieM posted an update in the Group logo of Gardening  Au NaturelGardening Au Naturel group 1 year, 10 months ago

    It is almost time to start planting here on the Southwest coast of Oregon. Just the cool weather stuff. Good time for starting indoors.

    • Same here in Scotland Jimmie. I've started some salad indoors

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    • I'm up on the Mountain Jimmy. Can't start anything outside till April, & even then it's still "iffy" 😉

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      • Ya the elevation is working against you.
        Things like lettuce, cauliflower, Broccoli, can be started now and ready to plant out by then. radish can maybe go out now for you and just covered with a small plastic tent when a hard freeze is coming. the more gentle frost does not hurt these types of plant much. I think by mid March you could do Radish…[Read more]

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    • I envy you guys talking about gardening already. The snow here just disappeared a couple days ago & they're saying that it's going to snow again tomorrow. I usually can't put anything in the ground before mid June or early July. It takes until at least then for the ground to dry out enough so that I'm not playing in mud.

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  • Screening.Does anybody have any tips or advice for a fast growing plant to give quick coverage this summer. Or looking more long term a plant that will give a not too bushy but permanent screen approximately 5 foot in a couple of years. Thanks.

    • A plant that grows to 5 feet in a couple of years will be very bushy/tall,due to the nature of the fast growth,a good plant screen can take ten years to be effective,so I put a 6 feet 6 inch fence.

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    • Thanks Trevor – will try to upload a photo. Note that the screen is about 10 feet inside the garden – just to supplement the 6ft fence on the boundary from overlooking upstairs windows

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    • Top tip John!

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    • Last year one of our neighbours cut all the top growth from trees in his garden that were giving us privacy. While it is growing back, we have put in a screen of tall poles (we used Norway spruce) about 18 inches apart. Rather than putting up fence panels, we just wove in a 2ft band of hazel wands between 5ft and 7ft above ground level. This…[Read more]

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    • Thank you fellas.

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    • Trumpet Vine grows quickly but can be invasive as is honeysuckle. Find a local garden center that specializes in native plants. That way you can have privacy and help out your local birds and bees.

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    • Marijuana grows quite fast

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    • If you have enough water a living willow fence could be the answer. 3ft long willow whips rooted into a trench at a 45 degree angle will grow a screen very quickly if it has plenty of water. Here is a link, one of many, which illustrates the idea http://www.southyeofarm.co.uk/willow/sales.htm

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    • Thanks Eric. A fence did cross my mind. But because it is an area within the garden and not too far from the boundary fencing, I think that it might just be too much wood!

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    • Virginia creeper. It does require something to climb on. I will add a picture of what I built for privacy to nude sunbathe as I live in town.

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  • First round of seed setting completed and already some seedlings are appearing in their seed trays. We've been gardeners for years but this sight and the prospect of harvesting the fruits of our labour never fails to excite and amaze. Isn't nature wonderful?

    • I hope to pick up some ideas when I am staying with you. I have half an acre and no expertise whatsoever. Also a new kitchen and no ideas. Real tabula rasa!

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  • verified badge Steve & Denise posted an update in the Group logo of Gardening  Au NaturelGardening Au Naturel group 4 years ago

    Has anyone any first hand experience of organic solutions to kill tree stumps. Yes I know digging it out by hand is the only truly organic solution. Normally removal of a tree is a worst case scenario but our site is plagued with a number of really invasive trees and shrubs that re-appear each spring, no matter how much you cut back the new…[Read more]

    • It depends what they are and how big they are… many european broadleaved trees will coppice quite happily and push up new growth year after year. You could try damaging the stumps by burning them after manually removing as much as possible, perhaps drilling some holes to allow penetration of some accelerant. (Depends how organic you view these,…[Read more]

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      • I like the idea of alcohol as an accelerant. Rakija or Loza (the local home still produced hooch) is cited by many in the region as a "cure all" but this is a new spin on it's qualities I'll have to try. 🙂

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    • I spent a few weeks recently digging out tree stumps. It was fantastic exercise (although a tick bite during it did give me Lyme disease) and once you get started it really isn't that difficult. A shovel, a saw and a crowbar and I was pulling them out in a couple of hours.

      Alternatively I've tried building bonfires on top of them. While it does…[Read more]

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    • I think you're right, digging them out is really the best way. Sounds like a job for willing volunteers this year 😉 I've used stump pulling winches before but I don't have one in Montenegro. Might be something for my Christmas list. Thanks all for your replies.

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    • Don't use a chainsaw on tree roots – the chain will soon be damaged. My preferred way is to leave nature to do the work by letting fungi eat away the roots – but this takes years.

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    • True, A woodsman also advised me never to chainsaw close to the ground as a surprising amount of grit can find it's way up the lower trunk. A recipe for a blunt chain. That said, one of the advantages of living here is that my local Stihl dealer will re-sharpen a chain on his jig for 2 Euros.

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    • Sometimes making a few cuts across the top of the stump will help kill it off. Copper nails hammered into the side of the stump, about every 5cm, will do the job, it takes a while to work though. I've heard that leaving one of the main roots in a bucket of salty water will also work, but haven't tried it.

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    • I have drilled small holes in the top and added some rock salt and vinegar. It does seem to stop little shoots from growing. Once I poured some boiling hot water over the top to help stop new growth. This takes time to weaken the stump, but it is less work than chopping it out.

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  • verified badge Steve & Denise posted an update in the Group logo of Gardening  Au NaturelGardening Au Naturel group 4 years ago

    Really surprised there's not more activity in this group. There's not even a category in the outdoor list for gardening. With the possible exception of swimming there's nothing I like to do better than work naked (except for a stout pair of walking boots) in the garden.